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Bottle Rot

In previous blogs we've highlighted the importance of limiting carbohydrate intake to meals to prevent adult teeth decay. This idea is just as important for children as it is for adults! Good oral health starts at a young age, and it’s important we do everything possible to prevent tooth decay from the moment those baby teeth emerge. 

 Sometimes bedtime can be a struggle, and a bottle might seem like an easy solution. However, putting a baby to bed with a bottle of milk or juice does more harm than good and the easier bedtime routine often comes at the expense of the baby’s oral health. Keeping those baby teeth healthy is crucial so that the adult teeth will have a better chance of coming in healthy and straight.

What Is Bottle Rot?

 Prolonged exposure to the sugars in milk or juice erodes the enamel on a baby or toddler’s teeth, particularly the central incisors. If you’ve ever heard of the phrase “baby bottle tooth decay” or the more sinister-sounding “bottle rot,” this is what it refers to, and it’s definitely something to avoid. It can also happen with sippy cups and even breastfeeding! If a baby’s gums and teeth aren’t properly cleaned after feeding, the sugary milk residue left in their mouth increases the risk of tooth decay.

 Stopping Bottle Rot Before It Starts

 Preventing bottle rot is simple: only use a bottle for the baby’s mealtimes, not to soothe them or help them fall asleep when they aren’t hungry. A pacifier will be much healthier for their teeth. After the baby reaches six months old, it’s safe to use a bottle of water, or a sippy cup of water for toddlers. 

 After every meal, make sure to clean out milk residue. Once baby teeth start appearing, it’s time to start brushing them. Use a soft toothbrush and a dab of toothpaste no larger than a grain of rice. Because babies can’t rinse and spit, make sure to use a non-fluoride toothpaste that is safe to swallow.

 Treating Existing Bottle Rot

 If your baby is already showing signs of tooth decay, come see us! We’ll be able to assess the extent of the decay, deal with any cavities, and come up with a plan to prevent future damage. One of the easiest steps you’ll be able to take at home is to limit their consumption of sugary drinks like juice and soda. 

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